Orange Cranberry Scones

It’s been awhile since I have made scones. I don’t know why I don’t make them more often. They are easy, fairly quick, very tasty, and the freeze and reheat well. What’s not to like?

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In fact, for this week’s Tuesdays with Dorie recipe, Buttermilk Scones, I decided to double the recipe because I knew we would like them. Plus, I had a couple of organic oranges sitting around. To help make the cutting in of the butter easier, I enlisted the help of my trusty food processor.

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Then, I added a generous amount of dried cranberries because they go so well with citrus and are really tasty in a scone.

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I made twelve regular sized triangular scones and twenty-four small square shaped ones. I sprinkled them with coarse, raw sugar instead of the regular sugar that was called for in the recipe. I love how the cranberries look like jewels.

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We loved them. There were some wonderful layers and eaten just warm, they were soft and fluffy on the inside with a little crunch from the sugar on the outside. They make a great companion to tea or coffee breakfast or snack time. I’m thinking of making some more, but subbing the orange zest for lemon and using blueberries instead. Or chocolate.

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Really, I think you could add anything to these and they would still be good. They are perhaps not the best scones I have ever made, but it is one of those recipes that is simple, reliable, and just plain good. You can’t really go wrong here.

Orange Cranberry Scone
adapted from Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan

3 cups (15 ounces) all purpose flour
1/3 cup (2.5 ounces) sugar
2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoons baking soda
3/4 teaspoons salt
1 1/2 sticks (6 ounces) unsalted butter, chilled and cut into small pieces
1 cup buttermilk, plus more if needed
Grated zest from one orange
1/2 cup dried cranberries

For topping:
3 Tablespoons melted butter
3 Tablespoons coarse or raw sugar

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment.

Combine flour, sugar baking powder, baking soda, salt, and orange zest in a food processor bowl. Pulse a few times to mix the dry ingredients together. Add the butter pieces and pulse until the pieces are no larger than a pea, about 8-10 times. Pour into a large bowl.

Stir the cranberries into the flour. Then, add the buttermilk and toss with a spatula or fork until most of the flour is moistened. If it seems really dry and won’t hold together when you squeeze a bit of it with your fingers, then add extra buttermilk, a tablespoons at a time, until the dough starts to come together. There will still be some crumby bits in the bowl, though.

Dump out the dough onto your counter or pastry board and knead gently until the dough is more or less one shaggy mass. If you bowl is big enough, you can also do this inside the bowl and it will be less messy. Divide the dough in half. Pat each half into a 1/2 inch thick 7 inch diameter circle. Using a sharp knife, cut each dough circle into six wedges and transfer to your baking sheet with at least one inch of space between them.

If you want to make smaller scones, pat the entire amount of dough into a 1/2 inch thick rectangle, roughly 8 inches by 12 inches. Then, cut into twenty-four two inch squares.

Brush each scone with melted butter and sprinkle with coarse sugar. Bake until slightly browned around the edges, about 13-15 minutes for large scones, 10-12 for small scones. Serve warm.

These will keep for a few days in a sealed bag, but should be toasted in the oven for a few minutes before eating to crisp them up. They can also be frozen, already baked for several months. Thaw and toast lightly before serving.

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Posted on March 4, 2014, in Baking, Recipe, Tuesdays with Dorie, Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 16 Comments.

  1. I almost added cranberries to mine as well! These look beautiful. I love the bigger sugar crystals on them!

  2. Your scones look tender and flakey. I chose to add orange zest and cranberries too. I make scones quite a bit. They are great to have around for guests. My usual addition, and favorite, is blueberries.

  3. These look so good! Orange and cranberry is the perfect combination!

  4. The cranberries do look like rubies. Your scones look wonderful. Ya blueberries and lemon sounds good too

  5. those look delightful.. I like the thought of add-ins here.

  6. Beautiful!!!
    You’re right, you could add anything to these and they would still be great.
    I like this kind of recipe which are customizable!!

  7. Yum. How do you keep slim and trim with all those baked goodies? Do you run marathons at the weekend?

  8. Mmmm…orange and cranberry, such a good combination. They look delicious.

  9. Love the picture of the scones piled high! They look delicious :)

  10. I wish I’d doubled the recipe! I love your addition of a generous amount of cranberries. I bet these were wonderful.

  11. These look wonderful! I think I’ll try some with dried cherries since I don’t have any cranberries on hand. Thanks for the inspiration!

  12. Love the look of the cranberries in your scones. Lovely!

  13. Just beautiful. I love your combination of orange and cranberry! I made these with the lemon zest and added dried cherries. This recipe is definitely open to so many variations. I used demerara sugar, though seeing others that used regular sugar, I just may have to try that as well – along with your combination.

  14. orange-cranberry are my second favorite scone to make (blueberry-lemon being the first)!

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